The Reality of Placements in NLUs: The Bare All Disclosure by a CNLU Patna Student

I am a 5th year student from Chanakya National Law University, and have been a regular follower of Lawctopus.

I recently saw your article on the recruitment figures of some of the top National Law Schools namely NLS, NALSAR and NUJS which showcased a splurge of job offers whereas on the contrary schools like RMNLU are doing their best to keep their feet just off the ground.

Thus in a fit of anger, frustration and disappointment, I am writing to you to let you know of the pitiable condition of these so called “National Law Universities” which are just surviving on the mirage glory of its “National” tag.

Every passing year NLUs are screwing up (pardon my language) the future of a plethora of students who are jobless not because they lack the merit or are anyway inferior to the other blue bloods but by the simple reason that their college administration are just interested in collecting their respective tuition fee and other administrative charges.

What the administration does is install lifts and air conditioners in the faculty chambers rather than providing qualitative faculty members or books for that matter in the library.

Editor’s note: RMLNLU’s batch of 2014 has 150 students in total. 80 out of these 150 sat for placements. Only 21 out of 80 got jobs. Out of the 21 jobs, 8 were at LPOs. Read HERE.

And this personal vendetta against students does not end right there, we have a 75% compulsory attendance in all 5 years including 10th semester, which basically rummages our chances to even secure a PPO since no firm would even get a a hang of who you are and what you are capable of doing in a 21 days internship.

That being said securing an internship in the first place is also a blind race for most of us, we make our own contacts (jugaad) and hope against hope that somebody in that firm/ organisation or institution notices us.

We the batch of 2009-2014 are graduating in June 2014, with only 2 people placed right now (if only you can call that so, because the terms of recruitment are subjected to a paid internship for 6 months with a promised stipend of Rs. 15,000).

So much for studying 5 years in a National Law School.

So much for taking an exam among 50,000 aspirants and making to a National Law School.

So much for taking a student loan and promising your dad, that better days would come soon.

So much for expecting that merit at the end of the day wins.

And Dear Law Firms, if you are listening, may be, just may be we don’t belong to the top law schools, but it might surprise you that we might know just as much or may be more than those you recruited.

May be its time, you come up with a recruitment policy that helps you pick up talents from all law schools, help us to help you to form a better legal fraternity.

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Comments Till Now

  1. Anuraman Sinha says:

    Dear writer, applaud for the drafting skill shown here, this writeup suggest that you guys are about to miss the chance of becoming a highly paid legal clerk after your Nlu session. Avoiding further bitter lines to demoralize you guys, I just want to say that Dear you all passing outs are gem and we need you to upgrade our judicial environment, Guys you respective state High court or trail court is waiting for their gems. Go n struggle there to show the what you are in for.

  2. The Writer says:

    There were some typo’s in the previous post. My laptop keyboard is a bit fucked. Kindly excuse 🙂

  3. The Writer says:

    Guys,

    To all those who appreciated this post, thanks a lot. I really acknowledge the way, some of you even defended this article.

    To Clat Aspirants 2014, please make a conscious choice will picking up a college to pursue your graduation. Don’t get your hopes too high, this world is a cruel, cruel place.

    To those who dissent: Here is the thing, I am in the top 5 of my batch, I have interned in atleast 4 law firms which feature in the top 10 of the rsg ratings and legal 500. I also got a call back from one of these firms, and though I wanted to extend my internship, I had to stick to the attendance guidelines and get back to my college. BTW one of my co-interns who interned there for 4 months got the job, though I did get a lot of appreciation 🙂 If that just felt bad, here is another one, I had to refuse an internship at one of the top 3 law firms in Ind, because a subject faculty refuse to prepone or postpone certain presentations for a seminar paper. So yes, I think I did my part. If you ask me if I could have done more, I most definitely could have, but a little bit of support would have gone a long way 🙂

  4. shivani sharma says:

    horrible to hear this specifically when i am myself preparing to appear for clat 2014….
    hope its nt true…atleast some of it..

  5. "Tier I" If That Means Anything says:

    I disagree actually. I understand the authors concern, but I believe him to be a little misinformed (which may be the cause of his current predicament, taking nothing away from his argument about a not so friendly or helpful administration). However, I think the author and anyone currently in this predicament need to wake up to the fact that the so called “top-notch” NLUs do not have the most student-savvy administration either. Speaking from experience at a “top-notch” or “tier I” law school I can safely say and I know others will agree with me that college administrations are uniformly inert and self-serving. In fact, I’d say CNLU is lucky that there are ACs and lifts for atleast the faculty because some of the older law schools lack that too. Most recruiment efforts in any NLU are influenced by the batch Recruitment and Placement Committees which interfaces with firms on behalf of the students. The administration rarely has any role to play in this. Developing and utilizing personal contacts too is a part of the process since obviously everyone in a batch cannot be in the Top 10 or 20. In fact at the end of the day, it is up to an individual student to intern at a variety of law firms, do well academically and build up a strong CV in order to get placed. I don’t know of any law firm which discriminates against any so called “lower rung” NLU. In fact, law firm campus recruiters have repeatedly stressed that their internship processes are transparent and fair and they offer students a chance to prove themselves as long as the college RPC approaches them on behalf of each batch. Its just a matter of following a set procedure.

    In light of this, it seems illogical to blame bad placements on college infrastructure and administration, since those things are a lowest common denominator across law schools (NLUs or not). The answer clearly lies in the hands of the students themselves.

    • RGNUL boss says:

      couldn’t resist, so have to mention, RGNUL may not get you placement, but it definitely provides ACs for all the students even in hostels, mess, common rooms :p

      • Anonymous says:

        How is the faculty? Actually, I am going to be a student at RGNUL in the BA.LLB. course soon, so, I am really curious to know about the teaching style and the level of knowledge they disseminate in their students.
        I would really appreciate your reply to this.

  6. Eye opener says:

    Dear Anonymous,
    The minimum cut-off of attendance as per the mandate of BCI (the controlling body for advocates) is 66% . Please refer the following link: http://lawmin.nic.in/la/subord/bcipart4.htm

    Go to Section A!

    And yes NLU tag really does not matter. If that is so, what is the necessity of allowing the other 900 law colleges to run! Then all the so called “NLUans” will get a job for sure!

  7. Aditya Vardhan says:

    Fantastic.. !!

  8. Think about those law schools/colleges, like ILS, which don’t even have the privilege of carrying the NLU tag.
    Their students too have some great potential, especially because our seniors often fill the lacunae in our college administration.
    Juniors, like I, are very worried.

  9. An eye-opener for those who think that their life is all set and done by just entering into any NLU.
    Actually that’s not even the start, the real struggle begins once we are into it. Getting placements is never solely based on academics. as there is immense lack of skilled legal processionals in India, all that is required is how skilled a person is in the legal sphere. All one needs to do is look up for opportunities and work honestly towards it.

  10. Anonymous says:

    Just to note a minor point, the 75% attendance rule is a UGC requirement and is followed by all law schools which get UGC recognition and funding. At certain law schools such as NALSAR and NLU Jodhpur the attendance requirement was actually 90% till very recently.

    • I hate to contradict, but.. says:

      Dear Anonymous, just to let you know- Some NLUs even have 95% attendance, for example NUALS, Kochi. This policy of compulsory attendance is practiced even today.

      • Anonymous says:

        To add to that, your attendance carries 5 marks of the total score, by which I mean that if you have 95% attendance or above in ‘every subject’ specifically, you get the 5 marks, which is but ridiculous because we didn’t even have this policy in school and never had the slightest hint that we would have it in college.

      • The attendance requirement is set at 95% for 5 internal marks in NUALS, Kochi. Now if you wish to forego those 5 valuable marks, you can take the risk and can miss classes for 10to12 hours for 1 semester. That is around one week. It becomes so difficult to participate in other National Activities, because of the mere 95% limit. We have tried our best, to bring this up with the administration, but to no avail. The college administration has been completely insensitive to our demands.

  11. nayaksakshi says:

    this piece of writing was an eye opener….I was so wrong about these NLU’S Thanks to the writer!!

  12. Thank god, I chose SLS over them.
    Really good of the writer to speak up

  13. Anonymous says:

    I agree…there should be no problem in airing or displaying any college’s dirty laundry ….the situation is miserable day by day…cnlu increased seats to recruit students from all over India..and it turned out against them…as there is no cream of students coming into the university …all this is very evident…the administration is sleeping…on witnessing this the rest of the students also are…little fight is left in the senior most batch…the founding batches are about to leave and there will be complete chumps of shapeless bundles…credit goes to the vc also…I am sure he doesn’t remember any 5th year students name…but he will definitely remember the names of people who are childran of judge or children of the member of executive committee of college…well with that being said…I wud like to take this opportunity to wish all the very best to the 5th years …my batch mates…law fraternity is here they are watching and it is upto us to prove our credentials..

  14. The Writer says:

    @ramanuj,

    There are certain things I would like to point out:

    1. The off-campus recruitment is no way fairer as compared to on-campus recruitment. The glitz of coming from a branded NLS chases most of us there too, as the employers would rather train a tier 1 law school student than a tier 3.

    2. Most of the law firms or corporate houses are looking for people with experience. The joke being we cannot have any experience unless you provide us with one.

    3. One of the essential factors behind writing this article was to argue on the point that we should not have to settle for ‘other opportunities’, because we invested the same amount of effort, money and learning (read earned the knowledge) to be able to atleast put ourselves for an interview before the top law firms.

    -The writer

    • already Placed nlu-ites says:

      to the dear writer of the post,
      Arrey Bhai CNLU-ite,
      1) it sounds arrogant and rough but the reality is that the best are in the best. you cant compare a student from the top tier law school with tier 3 law school. you simply cant.

      2) if you really have put on so much efforts( i really don’t think money makes any point) it must have been visible somewhere or the other. if case you ever get a chance to have a look at the CV’s of the student from the these top tier law school , you will realise the effort you are talking is no where comparable to there efforts in the terms of papers, moots and others criteria.

      3) finally, bhaijaan!!! apka Vice chancellor bhi former NAlSARITE hai.

      • Dear Already placed NLUItes ,

        Your comment just gives further proof of the rank elitism and privilege among students of NALSAR and NLS ( I am from one of them, btw). You can compare a student from tier 1 college and a tier 3 college. I know students from GLCs and lower ranked NLUs, who would outsmart and beat the most “brilliant” minds of NLS or NALSAR. They are much more hardworking, sincere, committed and have much better work ethics. If they have not been placed, its because of bias on the part of these firms. Since, you would only know the contents of your CV, I suggest you refrain from passing judgements on the CV value of people from other “lesser” colleges. They are equally good if not better and they know they were at a disadvantage in terms of brand value when they first joined and have worked really hard to make up for it.

        • NALSAR Alumnus says:

          They might have worked really hard to make up for it but I wish they had worked as hard at the entry level to ensure they were good enough for the top law schools. There is a reason for which top rank NLU students get good jobs- they work hard in clat AND they work hard in law school which shows their consistency. FYI, not everyone from NALSAR/NLS get placed at tier 1 law firms. It is only the good ones.
          If people have so much information in their hands so that they are able to switch to law from the run off the mill engineering, they should at least have the sense of choosing the right college based on placement history which is transparent.
          Someone made a point about better research skills- it is a fact: the difference that I noticed during internships between students from NALSAR and even RMLNLU was striking in terms of the quality of research.
          Stop blaming the admin for everything!! They are bad everywhere- you have to carve your own niche. The world is unfair, get used to it.

  15. Rebel4change says:

    I am a 5th year student from Chanakya National Law University, and HAS been a regular follower of Lawctopus. Bhai aisi angrezi likhoge to placement kahan se hoga? I don’t think anyone proof-reads the posts for lawctopus. Tch Tch

    • The Writer says:

      Dude, may be you missed out on the frustration, anger and disappointment part or wait! you were too busy finding a grammatical mistake. Wasn’t that the whole point of writing this article.

      BTW did you ever get a chance to proofread any agreement during your internship? I think you got the hint 🙂

  16. John Snow says:

    Clifford Chance, one of the big five “magic circle” law firms in the United Kingdom, has quietly introduced a “CV blind” policy for final interviews with all would-be recruits. Staff conducting the interviews are no longer given any information about which university candidates attended, or whether they come from state or independent schools. For complete report visit the link: http://www.independent.co.uk/student/news/exclusive-law-firm-clifford-chance-adopts-cv-blind-policy-to-break-oxbridge-recruitment-bias-9050227.html

  17. Anonymous says:

    I agree…there should be no problem in airing or displaying any college’s dirty laundry ….the situation is miserable day by day…cnlu increased seats to recruit students from all over India..and it turned out against them…as there is no cream of students coming into the university …all this is very evident…the administration is sleeping…on witnessing this the rest of the students also are…little fight is left in the senior most batch…the founding batches are about to leave and there will be complete chumps of shapeless bundles…credit goes to the vc also…I am sure he doesn’t remember any 5th year students name…but he will definitely remember the names of people who are childran of judge or children of the member of executive committee of college…well with that being said…I wud like to take this opportunity to wish all the very best to the 5th years …my batch mates…law fraternity is here they are watching and it is upto us to prove our credentials..

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