Book Review by Nupur Walia: Law as a Career by Tanuj Kalia [LexisNexis]

Full disclosure:

1. The author of the book, Tanuj Kalia, also runs this website.

2. Nupur Walia, the author of the book-review, has worked with Lawctopus.com as a college manager.

By Nupur Walia

When I received my copy of the book and began to glance at the pages, I thought to myself : ‘I wish I had come across a book like this when I joined my law school.’ It looked very informative prima facie. And it is indeed.

The book is a great source of information for the people who have no legal background and as freshers, they are often daunted by the challenges of balancing between the law school life and the extra curricular, having little to no idea where and how to began the work on research papers, prepare for moot court competitions.

The book is a valuable source of information for law aspirants, law students and law graduates equally.

Even when a student graduates from the law school, he/she might be in a fix, as to making a career move that will turn out to be a success.

The book succinctly discusses different career options, from highly lucrative to less lucrative and enlists the pros and cons.

From covering the tips for Law School Entrance Tests’ preparations to the extracurricular opportunities one can look at during their law school years to structuring internships, the book carefully imparts the valuable interview tips and provides a specimen CV, drafted by Vahura, which again is very needful for the first year students.

It is amazing that the author has given importance to the fact that lawyers are social engineers as well and has discussed the career option of working at a NGO/Think Tank, which is a field personally close to my heart.

Being a blogger and writer myself, I was directed by my professor to pursue legal journalism. I don’t know if I will work diligently in this direction but the advice to use RTI to build a career in legal writing is a sound piece of advice.

And now comes the part where the book closes it’s chapters with the parting advice.

My favorite chapter for yet another reason that’s close to my heart.

The life of specially abled people is quite a driving force in my life and no, I don’t like to patronize them by calling them inspirational. But I like reading about the people who establishes themselves in various fields despite the physical limitations.

During two of my internships, I met one lady advocate who was disabled and had to use crutches while going up and down the ramp in courts. In another internship, I saw a very old male advocate who was wheelchair bound but pleaded so flawlessly.

Having been the reader of Nilesh Singit’s blog on disability issues for a long time and noticing Tanuj’s awareness of the same (as is seen on the footnote on Page. 224) and his attempt to talk about ‘Law as a career for the differently abled,’ and ‘Women in Law’ is indicative of the author’s considerate personality.

And with the inclusion of both these chapters, the appreciation for the book and the author grew immensely.

I really like the cartoons by Sparsh Goyal.

I always feel that good students may not be everywhere but a good student can come from anywhere.
Since this book is one of its kind to be available in the market, I would recommend it to anyone who wants to make the best out of his law school years.

Having worked with Tanuj, I like the way he maintains professionalism with a very friendly approach. His hard work and research speaks for itself in this book.

Voracious reading goes a long way in the life of a law student. So why not begin with this book to unfold the law school experience from ‘where you are at’ to ‘where you can be‘?

Also recommended for anyone in the law school, even if you are in the FINAL YEAR.

The author had to research to present all this to us,two years after his graduation, which only means that there was more to what he already knew and much of few other things that he ought to know.

So grab this book, and find what can still be known and ace at it.

Hope this book reaches to the lesser known law colleges in India and gives some law student the hope they need.

I recommended this to this one young maverick from Mewar Law Institute. This book is exactly what he needs.

Full disclosure:

1. The author of the book, Tanuj Kalia, also runs this website.

2. Nupur Walia, the author of the book-review, has worked with Lawctopus.com as a college manager.

Buy the book on Amazon here

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Comments Till Now

  1. Instead of making a disclosure, write a disclaimer, telling the readers that this is a biased post. If you really want a review get it from an independent person. “THESE POSTS TEND TO BE BIASED AS THESE ARE WRITTEN BY THE PEOPLE WHO WORK FOR THE EDITOR OF THIS WEBSITE”

    • Thakur Digvijay Singh says:

      Instead of making comments here, why dont u read it and then write a review of this book. May be then it’ll satisfy you. Atleast give it a read first then you’ll realise whatever is written in this post is true and not biased.

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